polymer clay craft

𝐌𝐚𝐤𝐢𝐧𝐠 𝐚 𝐍𝐨𝐬𝐟𝐞𝐫𝐚𝐭𝐮 𝐕𝐚𝐦𝐩𝐢𝐫𝐞 𝐀𝐫𝐭 𝐃𝐨𝐥𝐥

I recently wrapped-up making a Nosferatu vampire art doll inspired by the character from the classic film of the same name. I used reference images from the film and also found some inspiration as I did research about the original film, there was one line that stuck with me that described Nosferatu as vermin-like as opposed to the more debonair portrayals of vampire that we’ve had in later media.




One point where my version of Nosferatu diverges from the film version is that the costumers had given him these long, thick eyebrows, which I found to be kind of silly looking, so I eliminated them from the design. Many modern interpretations of Nosferatu omit them, so I can’t be the only one that feels this way.

This is the final illustration that was created with the vampire art doll. If you would like a print, you can get one  here .

This is the final illustration that was created with the vampire art doll. If you would like a print, you can get one here.


It was also fascinating to read that Nosferatu was actually an illegitimate Count Dracula. As many people are aware, Bram Stoker wrote “Dracula” and when he passed his widow, Florence Balcombe, had authority over his works and didn’t authorize a film adaptation of the novel. This didn’t prevent the creators of Nosferatu from going so far as to advertise Nosferatu as adapted from Stoker’s Dracula!

I hope you enjoyed seeing this lurking terror come together! To be the first to know when I launch new polymer clay art videos, be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel and hit the bell icon (but because YouTube's wonky, you can also join the newsletter). Catch all of my videos here:  https://www.youtube.com/thedreamsyndicatearts. You can also find many of the supplies I use in crafting here: https://www.thedreamsyndarts.com/supplies-gear/. Until next time, make believe!



Painting the Brambling | Painting a Fantasy Creature Head

Now that the brambling's head is sculpted to my liking, it's time to lay down some paint! When painting a fantasy creature head, it's actually kind of important to ground yourself in realism because bramblings are elusive in the wild! I had to do the next best thing and bring a couple of tree branches into the studio. Who'd have thought realism's the best strategy when painting a fantasy creature head? By looking at this tree branch I could observe that it was largely a warm grey tone with moments of green and brown on it rather than that iconic brown Crayola crayon that we might all instantly imagine.

 

Watch the Brambling Head Be Painted with Acrylics Here

 

I used a range of earth-tones in painting the fey creature's head- siennas, umbers, ochers, and greens with touches of grey tones to dull-down the pigments. I also painted the head generally lighter than I would have naturally due to the fact that I was about to embark on trying my hand with an ink wash technique...

EXPERIMENTING WITH INK!

ACRYLIC INK

In painting this head, I tried a technique that was new to me: using an acrylic ink wash with dark toned ink. I had carved a lot of bark texture all over the brambling and I wanted a way to darken the recessed areas that didn't involve my painstakingly painting in dark tones and then carefully trying not to undo this work as I painted-in lighter tones. Before I used the technique on the actual fantasy art doll head, I tested on scrap sculpted piece I had (who'd have thought I was doing myself a favor when I accidentally sculpted two right hands for this art doll?!). Admittedly, I still feel like I can do a better job at highlighting sculpted details with this technique, but overall, I'm happy with the outcome.

 

If you would like a print of the Brambling final image, you can purchase it HERE.

 

I hope you enjoyed exploring this magical fey creature as much as I have! To be the first to know when I launch new polymer clay art videos, be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel and hit the bell icon (but because YouTube's wonky, you can also join the newsletter). Catch all of my videos here:  https://www.youtube.com/thedreamsyndicatearts. You can also find many of the supplies I use in crafting here: https://www.thedreamsyndarts.com/supplies-gear/. Until next time, make believe!

A Dragon is Born: Making A Poseable Mixed Media Dragon Art Doll 🐉

It feels so good to finally post a finished fantasy art doll project. In this last installment (for making the dragon anyway) in this St. George & the Dragon piece, I show the final steps for making a poseable mixed media dragon art doll. Once the polymer clay head was sculpted, painted with acrylic paints, the larger part of making this fantasy art doll involved sewing, lots and lots of sewing. I can find sewing unto itself a challenge with making visually pleasing seams and heck, I often find threading a needle and efficiently tying-off a seam to be a difficult at times, but you get to do crafting on hard-mode when you try to do these things with protruding spikes or wire for your thread to snag on!

 

Watch Part 3 in the St. George & the Dragon Piece | Making A Poseable Mixed Media Dragon Art Doll 🐉:

 

In next week's video, I'll be working on crafting a young St. George art doll where I'll be sculpting the figurine's polymer clay head. If you have any suggestions for future fantasy artdolls for me to work on, I'll happily take you suggestions in the comments below or on YouTube.

If you want to make the imaginary a reality, be sure to subscriber on YouTube!

If you want to be the first to know when I launch new polymer clay art videos, be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel and hit the bell icon (but because YouTube's wonky, you can also join the newsletter). At present, I am launching new videos Saturdays at 2pm EST and I will keep this information up-to-date on my YouTube channel's banner and "about" section here:  https://www.youtube.com/thedreamsyndicatearts.

Taking Flight with my First (Solo) YouTube Video with a Dragon Head Sculpt!

I've spent the last few months getting things together to bring this first polymer clay art doll tutorial (as well as many others). In this first video, I'm making a dragon head sculpt with Sculpey and in future videos I'll show you more of my process for making poseable art dolls. The head is sculpted with a few stainless steel clay sculpting tools and, more often then you would think, is shaped by my fingers. When I'm all done, this dragon artdoll will be for a St. George & the Dragon illustration.

 

Watch Part 1 in the St. George & the Dragon Piece | Dragon Head Sculpt with Clay:

 

The majority of my future videos will focus on fantasy characters from mythology and folk-lore, I've got some fey characters lurking in my sketchbook waiting to be brought to life. I've thought about doing fan art of characters I love, but I'm still not 100% sure I will- I'd love to make a Daredevil (and a bunch of the other Defenders characters) or The Rhino from Spider-Man (The Rhino's costume is just ridiculous!) or maybe if I do make them, I'll re-imagine them as fitting into more of a fantasy setting. What do you think? I'd also love to make the time to play around with stop-motion animation with my poseable art dolls.

 

If you want to make the imaginary a reality, be sure to subscriber on YouTube!

If you want to be the first to know when I launch new polymer clay art videos, be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel and hit the bell icon (but because YouTube's wonky, you can also join the newsletter).